Pupil Premium 2015/16 Grant Expenditure Report to Parents

Picknalls First School Allocation

Picknalls First School receives Pupil Premium funding in its school budget.  This funding is allocated to children who are eligible for free school meals, or have been eligible for free school meals at any point in the past six years, called Ever6.  The Government and Picknalls believes that the Pupil Premium grant, which is additional to the main school funding, is the best way to address the current underlying inequalities and to tackle disadvantage.

Children who qualify for the Pupil Premium grant at Picknalls make good progress as reflected in the internal termly data analysis. 

PRINCIPLES

  • To ensure teaching and learning opportunities meet the needs of all children
  • Place appropriate provision for all children belonging to vulnerable groups, including disadvantaged children
  • Pupil Premium funding will be allocated following a needs analysis which will identify priority groups and individuals
  • All activities through Pupil Premium are aimed at accelerating progress and moving children to least age related expectations
  • Pupil Premium money will also be used to enrich the experiences of more able children
  • The Governors of Picknalls will publish information on how they have used their Pupil Premium Grant to address the issue of ‘narrowing the gap’ for socially disadvantaged children – this will be published annually on our website
  • In making provision for socially disadvantaged pupils, we recognise that not all pupils who receive free school meals will be socially disadvantaged
  • We also recognise that not all pupils who are socially disadvantaged registered or qualify for free school meals
  • We will do everything possible to support any of our pupils who would benefit from additional help

2015/16 Review

INCOME

 

  • The Pupil Premium received in 2015-16 was £1320 per pupil.
  • 4% of our pupils from Reception to Year 4 are eligible for Pupil Premium funding (Ever 6)
  • Deprivation Pupil Premium (Ever 6 FSM) 30 pupils @ £1320 = £39,600
  • 2 service children @ £600 = £600
  • £1320 additional funding
  • Total funding received in 2015-16 = £41,520

Picknalls First School Pupil Premium Funding was spent on the following:

  • One-to-one support
  • Small group booster sessions in Maths and English
  • Group Support
  • Teaching Assistant interventions
  • Intervention materials
  • Standardised test materials
  • Uniform
  • Lunchtime Supervision Special Needs Report
  • Subsidised trips/Educational Residential Visits
  • Peripatetic Music Fees
  • Attendance of after school clubs
  • Resources
  • Supply

DATA IMPACT Review

 

The very large majority (89%) of children who qualified for the pupil premium grant in 2015/16 made at least expected progress with the large majority (74%) making better than /outstanding progress in at least one of the areas.  The three children who did not make at least expected progress are dual category children and also have special needs.  This can be evidenced in the internal termly data analysis.

 

Performance of Pupils Eligible for Pupil Premium Grant or in Local Authority Care 2014/15

Reading

Achievement

Progress

PP children % achieving end of year expectations in 2016

48%

PP children average annual progress = 4.0

(expected progress is 4.0)

Writing

PP children % achieving end of year expectations

33%

PP children average annual progress = 4.0

(expected progress is 4.0)

Maths

PP children % achieving end of year expectations

44%

PP children average annual progress = 4.1

(expected progress is 4.0)

 

Total number of Pupil Premium children in 2015/16 was 30.

Of these 70% are in multiple categories such as Special Educational Needs, English as an Additional Language etc.

 

How has Picknalls First School spent the pupil premium allocated funding?

 

We have chosen to spend our allocated pupil premium funds on the strategies below.  Leaders at Picknalls believe these have the greatest impact on diminishing the difference and allow the children to improve their readiness for learning.  However, leaders are continuously analysing the effectiveness of interventions.  If an intervention does not have the desired outcome and impact, leaders will ensure this is stopped or adapted and monitor the effectiveness of the new intervention used.

 

Description of Support in Place

Impact of Support

One-to-one support

        For pupils with significant needs

        Usually offered for Maths and English

        Carried out by qualified, specialist Teaching Assistant

         Enables pupils with significant, prolonged difficulties to access the curriculum

         Pupils develop good self-esteem through praise and encouragement 

         Pupils with behaviour difficulties make more progress 

         Pupils develop skills to work independently and with their peers

         Pupils are more likely to reach national expectations with an individual 1:1 programme

         Pupils make accelerated learning and therefore diminish the difference

Small Group Booster Sessions

     Additional Maths and English booster lessons

     Three part-time teachers delivering aspects of reading, writing, phonics and maths

         Pupils are much more likely to reach national expectations with a specifically tailored intervention programme

         Pupils make accelerated learning and therefore diminish the difference

         Content is tailored for individual pupils/small group specific needs

         Increased confidence and motivation

         Pupils enjoy individual/small group attention and support

Group support

          Offered to pupils requiring additional intervention at either Wave 2 or 3 provision level

          Support is offered during English and

          Maths lessons to improve essential skills

          May be offered during lunchtimes or specific withdrawal group interventions

          Carried out by qualified, experienced Teaching Assistants

         Allows pupils who make slow progress to access directed teaching and specific interventions designed to promote rapid progress

         Self-esteem is boosted through praise and encouragement

         Pupils understanding, motivation and attention is maintained during lessons

         Pupils develop skills to work independently and with peers

         Pupils make accelerated learning and therefore diminish the difference

Interventions

As a developing strategy and to support us in raising progress and achievement for vulnerable children we have introduced many interventions.  Teaching Assistants deliver interventions to individuals or small groups as and when required. Rapid phonics, Rapid writing and Rapid maths are in place and TA’s have been trained to deliver these.  From September 2015 we also offer Rapid maths.  We offer a variety of 33 different interventions for differing individual needs which include:

     Speaking and listening groups

     Pindora’s Box (fine motor development)

     Handwriting support

     English as an additional language groups (EAL)

     Phonics boosters

     Personal, social and emotional activity groups

     Daily readers

     Rapid phonics, writing and maths

     Sentence support

     Lego therapy

     Social skills groups

     Dyslexia Centre support

     Spelling support

     Gifted and talented groups

     Maths, reading, comprehension and writing booster groups

     Use of the iPad

     Music therapy

     Games club

     Launch the Lifeboat

     Behaviour support

     DEMS pencil control group

     Fingerbobs

     Fischer Family Trust

     Speech and Language

 

         The very large majority of children (89%) made at least expected progress with the large majority (74%) making better than expected/outstanding progress (see schools internal data)

         Programmes are tailored to individual/small group needs therefore allow for accelerated learning and therefore diminish the difference

Standardised Tests

Alongside UFEP (Uttoxeter First Education Partnership) we now use the following assessments which all give an age related and standardised score:

     PUMA – Maths

     Salford – reading

     PIRA -  comprehension

We can prove where ‘rapid’ gains are accelerating progress and diminishing the difference

     Ensures our internal termly assessments are accurate

     Enables benchmarking internally and across UFEP and pyramid schools

     Allows us to prioritise and adapt work done

Lunchtime SEN Support

Pupil Premium funding has been put aside to provide Additional Needs Support assistants to offer one-to-one care for children with specific needs during lunchtime

     Specific behaviour needs are supported in integrating and co-operative play

     Social skills are modelled and reinforced

     Pupils with physical needs can access playground equipment 

     Children vulnerable from exclusion at lunchtime are included

     Children with communication problems have an adult who can help mediate

Subsidised Trips/Educational Visits and other items

Money has been set aside in the budget for all pupils to have the opportunity to attend school trips and residential visits.  This funding therefore supports families with financial difficulties.  We have supported children when purchasing uniform, paying for taxi’s to and from school etc.

     Children who may be excluded from certain activities are able to fully participate

     Improved confidence and self esteem

     Less pressure on families to support/subsidise aspects for themselves

Peripatetic Music Fees

Music has been put aside in the budget for some pupils receiving peripatetic music lessons.

     Increased confidence as able to develop skills in an area they enjoy

     Increased social skills and the opportunity to mix with peers they may not normally mix with

     Greater ability in specific musical skills

     Learning a skill for life

After School Clubs

Whether requested by parents or targeted children from school.  The school pays either a contribution towards the cost or the full fee.

     Increased confidence as able to develop skills in an area they enjoy

     Increased social skills and the opportunity to mix with peers they may not normally mix with

     Greater ability in specific skills such as guitar, violin, football etc.


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